Roasts & Grills

About Nora Kornheisl

Food Writer & Recipe Developer, Wife and Mother of two children.

5 Responses to Roasts & Grills

  1. Ian Scott says:

    Just discovered this site from your Facebook page. What is the drink that is in the photo on your “Drinks” page? What are the leaves? It looks interesting!

    • Nora Kornheisl says:

      Hi Scott,
      That is Moroccan mint tea. It’s the traditional and official drink in Morocco. The leaves you see are mint leaves.
      Here is how to make it:
      You will need a medium size, metal tea pot, 1 Tablespoon of Black Tea Leaves, sugar to taste, 8 to 10 mint springs.
      Boil the water. Place the black tea leaves in the tea pot. Pour just enough hot water on the tea leaves to rinse them, shake the tea pot in a circular movement for a few seconds. Pour the rinsing water out and discard of it.
      Place the mint in the tea pot with the black tea leaves. Fill the pot with boiling water. Add sugar and let the tea pot summer on medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes.
      Remove from the heat. Stir the pot with a tea spoon. Serve with food or with cookies.
      I took the above picture at a traditional restaurant in the city of Chefchaouen during my visit to Morocco in June 2012. In fact the sweetness of the tea or the mint, I am not sure which one, was attracting the bees and they were getting in my glass of tea each time I try to take a picture !
      Only in restaurants the mint leaves are placed in the glasses. That is more of a “commercial” way of serving tea. A classic glass of Moroccan mint tea is served really hot, foamy and amber colored.
      In the Moroccan culture, it is a shame to serve cold tea, a shame to serve “yellowish” tea (not simmered enough to reach the amber color) and a shame to serve tea with no foam on it!
      The tea pot is held about 20 to 30 centimeters above the glass, when pouring the tea. That is how the foam forms.

      I hope this was helpful, and thank you for asking.. I invite you to register for my blog updates. My upcoming posts will give you some very interesting information’s about the Moroccan culture and culinary traditions.
      Sincerely,
      Nora

      • Ian Scott says:

        Thanks, Nora!! I am originally from Northern Ireland, so I do appreciate a good cup of hot tea! :) Strong as well. As well, when we hold the tea pot above the cup, and there is “foam” o top, that is said to be a sign of good luck and wealth, too. And, I also enjoy mint with my lamb.

        So now I will have to try mint tea (just the other day, I saw mint plants for sale at my supermarket and almost purchased one) and let you know what I think of it.. but I think I am going to enjoy it!

        Thank you very much for your reply, Nora.

        Ian

        • Nora Kornheisl says:

          You are welcome. I was born and raised in Morocco. Almost everything related to food was made in a very traditional way in my family; from curing olives to making pastries. If you have any other questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

          • May says:

            I’m not sure if there’s a programmable mainhce that’s specific to making tea I know there’s a Mr. Tea mainhce though, just not sure if you can program it, or if you can make hot tea in it.Why can’t you use a programmable coffee mainhce though? Use tea bags or loose tea in the filter area where you put the coffee. The coffee mainhce doesn’t know it’s tea.References :

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect with Facebook

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>